Warren County Historical Society Presents …

“REWIND”

 

Camp Sulzer 1913 – Governor Sulzer – Queensbury

The year 1913 was the Centennial of Warren County New York; it was also the only year in which a New York Governor was impeached! The main thrust of the article regards Camp Sulzer, located atop Miller Hill (plain) off Route 9 in Queensbury. Miller Hill is the hill along Route 9 North from Quaker Road.

39th Governor Jan. 1, 1913–Oct 17, 1913 William “Plain Bill” Sulzer (1863–1941) Portrait: Leo Mielziner (1869–1935) was born in New York and became interested in art as a young man. He traveled to Paris where he established a career as a notable portrait artist, and lived with his family in Paris, New York, Cape Cod, and New Hampshire. 39th Governor Jan. 1, 1913–Oct 17, 1913 William “Plain Bill” Sulzer (1863–1941) Portrait: Leo Mielziner (1869–1935) was born in New York and became interested in art as a young man. He traveled to Paris where he established a career as a notable portrait artist, and lived with his family in Paris, New York, Cape Cod, and New Hampshire.

39th Governor
Jan. 1, 1913–Oct 17, 1913
William “Plain Bill” Sulzer (1863–1941)
Portrait: Leo Mielziner (1869–1935) was born in New York and became interested in art as a young man. He traveled to Paris where he established a career as a notable portrait artist, and lived with his family in Paris, New York, Cape Cod, and New Hampshire.

Governor Sulzer’s political career is a topic for another article in the future. However, he was in Glens Falls during Summer 1913 so a couple local photos will be included herein.

William “Plain Bill” Sulzer (1863–1941) was the first and only governor to be impeached. Prior to taking office, Sulzer served in the State Assembly and for eight terms in the United States House of Representatives. Elected governor with the support of Tammany Hall, he angered its leader, Charles F. Murphy, when he distanced himself from Tammany’s influence and supported primary elections. With Tammany’s encouragement, the State Assembly voted to impeach Sulzer on October 17, 1913. Convicted by a special court, Sulzer returned to New York City, but a month later was again elected to the State Assembly.

Governor Sulzer at Soldiers' Monument in Glens Falls, Summer 1913.

Governor Sulzer at Soldiers’ Monument in Glens Falls, Summer 1913.

 

 CAMP SULZER , Glens Falls, Summer 1913

Miller Hill Queensbury

 

The following information is based upon info from the January 1914 General Electric, article MILITARY CAMP LIGHTING.

General Electric Review January 1914.

Author in 1914, John Liston

“The following article describes an innovation in the use of electricity, viz., electric military camp lighting. In the introduction are named the primary requisites that must be possessed by the generating set to be used for this purpose, and the remainder of the article records the success of the first installation of this kind, which was at Camp Sulzer, August, 1913.—Editor. “

The 1913 encampment on Miller Plan was one of the first, if not the first, such camp that was to use electricity. Hence, the reason General Electric was interested in the back-story and the inclusion of the story in the General Electric Review.

 

Camp Sulzer 1913, note Frenbch Mountain clearly visible near top center of photo.

Camp Sulzer 1913, note French Mountain clearly visible near top center of photo.

Camp Sulzer wiring diagram, August 1913.

Camp Sulzer wiring diagram, August 1913.

It must be both simple and reliable in operation so that it may be safely entrusted to men lacking special electrical or mechanical training, and the fuel and other supplies required must be of such a nature as to be readily and generally procurable, or else easily and safely transported with the lighting equipment.

It must be so designed that the installing and assembling of the necessary wiring and lamps may be accomplished rapidly and also in a manner to insure freedom from accident during operation, by a comparatively few men and with a negligible effect on their purely military duties; and, lastly, its electrical characteristics must be such as to insure steady and efficient lighting.

The superiority of electric lighting over all other forms is so generally conceded that the relative values of the various forms of illumination available for temporary military camp lighting will not be here discussed, and the context will be devoted to an analysis of an electric lighting set which has already successfully undergone the “acid test” of actual service. This description will serve to indicate to what extent it meets the stipulated requirements.

The set consists of a single cylinder gasoline engine and a direct-current generator, the combined units having only two bearings and a common base, as is shown in Fig. 2. With the exception of the magneto, which is mounted on a bracket bolted to the end shield of the generator and directly coupled to the generator shaft, all the auxiliary equipment is compactly arranged above the generator on a metal pipe framework so that the radiator, gasoline tank, oiling system, rheostat, switch, etc., are readily accessible and require practically no addition to the ground space necessary for the generating unit alone.

The complete outfit is mounted on a small platform sledge, and has an overall length of 3 ft. 3 in., width 2 ft., and height 3 ft. b*/2 in. Its net weight is about 400 pounds, and the necessary boxing for protection.

Camp Sulzer Generator Package.

Camp Sulzer Generator Package.

“In addition to the general favor which the use of electric light gained throughout the entire camp, it may perhaps be said that in no department was its use more appreciated than in the field hospital.

While the installation was originally regarded as an experiment and the generating set was not especially designed or constructed for the work actually performed, its successful operation under conditions paralleling those which might be expected to obtain in military field service clearly indicates the feasibility of providing a durable and convenient portable lighting outfit for military camps.”

Description of Camp Sulzer Generator.

Description of Camp Sulzer Generator.

 

The area was featured in numerous articles in newspapers around the state such as: Oswego Daily Times August 6, 1913; Glens Falls Post Star August 4, 1913; Ogdensburg Journal August 5, 1913 as well as other New York State newspapers.

 

© August 16  2014, Warren County Historical Society

Compiled by: Gary Evans

 

 

 

Warren County Historical Society // 195 Sunnyside Rd. // Queensbury, NY 12804 // (518) 743-0734

 

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