Warren County Historical Society Presents …

“REWIND”

March 16, 2014

Cover of Warrensburg History Book.

Cover of Warrensburg History Book.

In 2013, Warren County celebrated their bicentennial.  Just one month before Warren County was formed, the Town of Warrensburg was established, so they, too, celebrated their own birthday in 2013.  In celebration of their 200th year, members of the Warrensburgh Historical Society and Town Historian, Sandi Parisi, published a book, WARRENSBURG NEW YORK, 200 YEARS of People, Places and Events.  This fascinating historical look at Warrensburg history is in encyclopedic format with entries researched and written by many members of the Warrensburgh Historical Society.  We would encourage anyone interested in local history to contact the Warrensburgh Historical Society to get your own copy at P.O. Box 441, Warrensburg, New York  12885 or whs7396@yahoo.com, or by calling Mrs. Parisi at 518-623-5153.

The material for this article came from the new Warrensburg history book, Warrensburg, New York, 200 Years of People, Places and Events and Turn-of-the-century Scrapbook of Jonathan Streeter Gates by William Preston Gates.

The Trolley Comes to Warrensburg:  Trolley Car No. 33

At the end of the nineteenth century, several stage lines operated in and out of Warrensburg.  Roswell B. Kenyon operated the Warrensburg to Glens Falls line.  The ride took 90 minutes and delivered passengers to Lake George where they could then take the train to Glens Falls.  It also met passengers in Lake George who were taking the 90 minute ride back to Warrensburg.

George T. Lockwood operated the Blue Line stage which shuttled passengers to Thurman Station where they would connect with the Delaware & Hudson Railroad after a 55 minute ride.  Lockwood also ran a second stage line from Warrensburg to Glens Falls for a ride that, like Mr. Kenyon’s, lasted 90 minutes as well.  Passengers boarding the train at Thurman Station were headed to Saratoga Springs and other points south.

In 1901 the Hudson Valley Railway was formed when many of the upstate rail companies consolidated.  The Warren County Railway, Stillwater and Mechanicville Street Railway Company, Greenwich and Schuylerville Electric Railroad, Saratoga Traction Company, Saratoga Northern Railway, and the Glens Falls, Sandy Hill, and Fort Edward Street Railroad Company all came together to operate under the Hudson Valley Railway Company.

The Auto Stage outside the Grand Army House in 1914. Around 1912, the Auto Stage Lines were started to connect Warrensburg to nearby communities. Service continued into the 1930s. It proved to be an important link between Thurman and Warrensburg, connecting the D & H rail line for passengers and mail. Photo courtesy of John Hastings

The Auto Stage outside the Grand Army House in 1914. Around 1912, the Auto Stage Lines were started to connect Warrensburg to nearby communities. Service continued into the 1930s. It proved to be an important link between Thurman and Warrensburg, connecting the D & H rail line for passengers and mail. Photo courtesy of John Hastings

What follows is an article taken from page 8 of Jonathan Streeter Gates’ collection:  Turn-of-the-century Scrapbook.  Note that it is dated Dec. 24th 1901 in Mr. Gates’ hand:

Newspaper article courtesy of William P. Gates.

Newspaper article courtesy of William P. Gates.

Warrensburg benefited from this consolidation when, in 1902, trolley service from Glens Falls to Warrensburg was started.  The service lasted from January1902-December 1927.  One could take the trolley from Warrensburg and end up in Troy, Albany and Schenectady.  The cost for a roundtrip ticket from Warrensburg to Schenectady was $3.00 in 1923.

The Warrensburg Trolley at the Terminus. Warrensburg was the northern point of the trolley line that started in Lake George and roughly paralleled Route 9. The trolley turnaround was at Adirondack Avenue. Photo courtesy of Steve Parisi.

The Warrensburg Trolley at the Terminus. Warrensburg was the northern point of the trolley line that started in Lake George and roughly paralleled Route 9. The trolley turnaround was at Adirondack Avenue. Photo courtesy of Steve Parisi.

The trolley made the stage lines obsolete, with the exception of the trip to Thurman Station.  Passengers could still take the stage until the Emerson-O’Connor Automobile Stage Line took over for the horse-drawn stagecoach.  The car-based ‘stage’ line to Thurman Station continued well into the 20th century.

Thurman Stage. The ‘stage line’ for mail and passengers between the D&H station at Thurman and Warrensburg was a horse-drawn wagon for many years. Photo courtesy of John Hastings.

Thurman Stage. The ‘stage line’ for mail and passengers between the D&H station at Thurman and Warrensburg was a horse-drawn wagon for many years. Photo courtesy of John Hastings.

Grand Army House. Becoming the Grand Army House in 1893 following life as a boarding house, the hotel held a ticket office for the trolley. It stood on the site of the current George Henry’s. Photo courtesy of John Hastings.

Grand Army House. Becoming the Grand Army House in 1893 following life as a boarding house, the hotel held a ticket office for the trolley. It stood on the site of the current George Henry’s. Photo courtesy of John Hastings.

The trolley terminated in Warrensburg.  Ticket offices were established at the Grand Army House hotel and the Adirondack Hotel.  A 1923 timetable listed ten departures daily from Warrensburg.

The Adirondack Hotel. First built c. 1825 as the Adirondack House and renamed the Adirondack Hotel in1867, it was a ticket office for the trolley company. Over the years it survived many changes, owners, and even a fire. In 1939, its name was changed to the Colonial Arms. It stood on the present site of the Rite Aid drug store. Photo courtesy of John Hastings.

The Adirondack Hotel. First built c. 1825 as the Adirondack House and renamed the Adirondack Hotel in1867, it was a ticket office for the trolley company. Over the years it survived many changes, owners, and even a fire. In 1939, its name was changed to the Colonial Arms. It stood on the present site of the Rite Aid drug store. Photo courtesy of John Hastings.

 

The Colonial Arms Hotel. Starting life as the Adirondack House, the Colonial Arms Hotel was where Marilyn Monroe stayed when she visited the area in 1949. Photo courtesy of Warrensburg Museum of Local History.

The Colonial Arms Hotel. Starting life as the Adirondack House, the Colonial Arms Hotel was where Marilyn Monroe stayed when she visited the area in 1949. Photo courtesy of Warrensburgh Museum of Local History.

 

© March 16  2014, Warren County Historical Society

This article was prepared by Stan Cianfarano for the Warren County Historical Society.  Information was taken from Turn-of-the-century Scrapbook of Jonathan Streeter Gates and the new history book published by the Warrensburgh Historical Society, WARRENSBURG, NEW YORK, 200 Years of People, Places and Events.  Photographs courtesy of the Warrensburgh Historical Society  and the Warren County Historical Society.

 

 

 

 

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